Nov

26

Quotation-Benjamin-Franklin-planning-preparation-motivational-Meetville-Quotes-76699The most read article on MTHFR.Net is ‘Methylfolate Side Effects‘.

That’s unfortunate.

Avoiding side effects caused by methylfolate is ideal.

It’s time I address it.

How do we reduce the likelihood of methylfolate side effects?

My experience has taught me these preventative measures. Before, I used to just give people methylfolate if they were found to have the MTHFR mutation.

If they had homozygous MTHFR C677T, I gave them more methylfolate than if they were heterozygous MTHFR A1298C.

Boy did that fail.

In order to supplement safely with methylfolate, you have to prepare your biochemistry and your genes.

In short, the most thorough way to prevent side effects from methylfolate is to read Dirty Genes.

Here is a short cut to help your body prepare – but – after you implement this, you still need to read Dirty Genes.

1. Electrolytes.

Methylfolate supports methylation.

Methylation supports cell growth and division.

What happens when a cell divides?

It becomes two cells. What happens when 10 billion cells divide? They become 20 billion cells.

What is inside these cells? Magnesium and potassium – and glutathione. If any of these are deficient, then the cell does not function properly, gets sick and dies.

As the cells malfunction, you malfunction. As the cells die, you experience greater side effects and a flare of your immune system – especially if your cells die a necrotic death which is what happens when the cells are very weak. This form of cell death triggers autoimmunity. Not good.

    • Solution: Take electrolytes BEFORE taking any form of methylfolate OR methylcobalamin. I formulated Optimal Electrolyte to really make a significant impact in one’s potassium and magnesium levels and also support mitochondria. They’re easy to take, taste good, mix readily in water and your picky children will be compliant with them as well.
    • Who needs electrolytes? Given that a significant number of us are potassium deficient (ie. 99% of women and 90% of men), I would venture to say everyone. I take electrolytes almost daily – usually right after I wake up – and sometimes a few times a day if I am exercising or sweating (sauna, heat). I simply feel much better while taking it.
    • Key signs that you need electrolytes:
      • Nausea
      • Dizzy
      • Frequent urination
      • Drinking water and then having to go to the bathroom quite quickly
      • Muscle aches/spasms
      • Frequent thirst which is insatiable
      • Dry skin
    • Key issues increasing need for electrolytes:
      • Stress
      • Exercise
      • Sweating
      • Diet high in sodium / low in potassium (MOST of us)
      • Caffeine intake
      • Processed foods (due to high sodium/low potassium)
      • High protein diet  (GAPS and Paleo – high protein depleting magnesium and potassium – especially if not eating greens/veggies)
    • How to take electrolytes: In a tall glass of water OR stainless steel OR glass water bottle, add 1 scoop of Optimal Electrolyte. Sip or drink one serving 20 minutes prior to exercise and possibly another serving during or after – depending on the duration of activity.
    • If you are not active due to fatigue, simply add 1/2 to 1 serving in a tall glass of filtered water and drink over a few minute time period.
    • NOTE: Fill your glass or water bottle half full. Then add the electrolytes. They fizz quite readily and may spill over if you add them to a full bottle or glass. Stir or shake the bottle lightly a few times (sealed of course!) and then fill to the top.

2. Glutathione. As methylfolate supports methylation, cells divide. As cells divide, the amount of glutathione they have reduces by…let’s say 50%. If one is already deficient in glutathione – and many people with MTHFR are deficient in glutathione – then there is going to be a flare of side effects.

Foods which increase glutathione are those which contain cysteine, glutamine and glycine. However, it is not that easy. Also requires magnesium, ATP, amino acid transport across the cell membrane and also the outer mitochondrial membrane. Then these components work together to form the glutathione.

Then, once the glutathione is formed, it gets used up quickly IF there is adequate selenium. After it gets used, it is damaged and has to get repaired and this requires vitamin B2 as active riboflavin. This active form of riboflavin is FAD and needs T4 thyroid hormone to form it. Hypothyroid? Hmmm.

    • Solution: Easiest way to increase glutathione levels is with liposomal glutathione. This allows the glutathione to ‘slip’ inside the cell with tiny liposomes. In fact, this is more effective at raising red blood cell levels of glutathione than IV glutathione – and significantly less expensive.
    • Who needs glutathione? Any one living and breathing. If you have any chronic condition, it is likely you are low in glutathione.
    • How to take glutathione: Start very slowly with a small amount. If you are sensitive in general to things, start with just a few drops. May mix liposomal glutathione in some juice if you like.
      • Pulsing glutathione is also likely recommended. This means taking it every other day or every few days initially. As you continue to improve or feel better, you may increase the frequency or the dosage…slowly.
      • If you feel worse, then stop taking it. You may need to open up your sulfite pathway with molybdenum first. If you know you do not tolerate sulfites – wine, dried fruits – or sulfur-containing foods like eggs, cruciferous vegetables or your flatulence smells like sulfur, then you should also support sulfite pathway first with B1 and molybdenum before you take glutathione. Avoiding sulfur-containing foods and supplements for a few days is also recommended to help clear out the sulfite pathway. Keyword there is ‘a few days’ – not a few months or forever. Introduce them back slowly – but first introduce glutathione.
      • If you still feel bad: This may be a sign that you are low in nutrients needed to recycle and utilize your glutathione. I formulated Optimal Liposomal Glutathione Plus for those who do not do well with regular glutathione even after adding molybdenum. This formulation has added selenium which helps you use the glutathione, has added molybdenum to process sulfites, has added riboflavin to recycle the glutathione and PQQ to help reduce damage to your glutathione.

 

3. Superoxide Dismutase (SOD). If glutathione and electrolytes don’t cut it, then superoxide dismutase, known commonly as SOD, may be deficient for various reasons. If you have SOD snps, are low in zinc, copper and/or manganese, then the likelihood you will experience side effects from methylfolate is high.

What does SOD do? SOD breaks down the very damaging reactive oxygen species called superoxide. SOD converts superoxide into hydrogen peroxide. It is then up to glutathione to clean up hydrogen peroxide (along with catalase).

Why does one get side effects from methylfolate with SOD issues? When taking methylfolate, your body produces nitric oxide from it. It is one of the results from supplementing with methylfolate. This is beneficial as nitric oxide increases blood flow. However, when SOD enzyme is not working due to SOD snps or mineral deficiencies of copper, zinc or manganese, then superoxide levels are likely high. If this is the case, then the high superoxide levels combine with the increased nitric oxide to form a very damaging pro-oxidant called peroxynitrite.

Solution: The best way to support SOD is to make sure your red blood cell levels of manganese, zinc and copper are in the normal ranges. If they are and you have a SOD snp, then you may need to supplement with SOD directly.

4. Protein or Methionine. If you not consuming adequate protein, you may not be consuming enough methionine. Methionine is THE amino acid which helps produce the body’s #1 methyl donor: SAMe.  If you are a vegan, vegetarian, have digestive issues, take antacids, eat like a snake (don’t chew much), drink a lot of fluids (of any type) during meals, then you may be low in methionine.

What does Methionine do? As mentioned above, it is the key amino acid needed to produce your most important methyl donor known as SAMe – also known as SAM, or s-adenosylmethionine. SAMe supports over 200 absolutely critical reactions in the human body. Another key point about SAMe is that it is the 2nd most important compound in our body. Who’s first? ATP which is your power source.

What happens if you increase methionine or protein intake before supporting with electrolytes and glutathione and SOD? Methionine is quite easily damaged by oxidative stress (think free radicals but this isn’t entirely correct as the term oxidative stress). If methionine is ingested from the diet in those with high oxidative stress (due to low glutathione and low SOD), then side effects may occur.

Point: Reduce your oxidative stress first with the glutathione and SOD – and possibly also PQQ and phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine. Selenium and riboflavin are also important – but I get into those below..

Why does one get side effects from methylfolate when methionine is low? In short, because methylfolate may make your methionine levels lower over time if you are not consuming enough protein. This gets complicated quickly and I am going to refrain from getting into it here. It will just lead to confusion.

What are the side effects from giving methylfolate when methionine is low? Histamine may increase. Histamine leads to running noses, itchy, skin disorders, tight chest (asthma or just difficulty breathing).

Solution: Eat more protein. This may be partly why some people do very well with GAPS or Paleo ‘diets’ as they are typically more protein. If you are eating more protein and still having issues, it may be that you are not absorbing it. Work with your doctor to increase absorption of your protein. Chewing helps and so does not drinking very much during meals as this dilutes your stomach acid and digestive enzymes.

These four recommendations may make a significant difference in how you respond to methylfolate and methylation in general.

  1. Electrolytes
  2. Glutathione
  3. SOD
  4. Methionine

Of course, there are other factors at play – such as a generalized deficiency in various B vitamins and other minerals.

If you know or suspect that you may be deficient in various minerals or vitamins, then it is important that you replenish many of them prior to supporting with methylfolate or methylcobalamin. Why? Because if you support with these two powerful methyl donor nutrients, it can cause a ‘clog’ in your biochemistry. This ‘clog’ may occur in how your brain chemicals (neurotransmitters) get formed and/or eliminated. Obviously, this can cause some significant issues.

The easiest way to replenish vitamins and minerals – and reduce some stress at the same time – is with Optimal Start. This is a specialized formulation I developed that helps people begin to restart their biochemistry without shocking it with methylfolate, methylcobalamin, iron or copper.

If you feel you are fine in most minerals and vitamins except B vitamins, then taking B Minus would be something to consider. B Minus is without methylfolate and methylcobalamin. This helps prime a lot of biochemical pathways without stimulating methylation. Most people respond very well to this formulation.

STRESS IS WASTEFUL AND DEMANDING

The biggest result I see is by reducing people’s stress and supporting their adrenals. Stress is a direct stimulator of methylation. If reducing stress, then the demand on methylation goes down. Therefore, your dependence upon nutrients such as methionine, methylfolate and methylcobalamin go down.

If one is stressed, they are using up a variety of nutrients – and their cortisol is likely low – especially if they have been stressed or anxious for some time. This leads to autoimmunity, fatigue, hypothyroidism, wasting, poor memory, hard to get out of bed in the morning, frequent urination (loss of K and retention of Na) and…

Supporting adrenals can be quite rapid if:

  • eating properly
  • avoiding caffeine and stimulants
  • supplementing with adrenal cortex (best taken in the morning around breakfast)
  • sleeping before 11 PM
  • getting at least 7 hrs of rest nightly
  • increasing activities which you really enjoy
  • avoiding high glycemic, refined carbohydrates
  • eating quality protein foods and quality healthy fats

If you are a person that is easily startled or irritated, then you are likely maladapted. This means your nervous system is geared towards reacting vs responding.

This isn’t healthy – and you know this.

The way to support this is by doing the above recommendations along with taking adaptogens.

Optimal Adrenal is a blend of adaptogens that I designed for those experiencing lack of clarity and stress. It is also effective for those easily startled, panicked or pissed off. It may be taken any time of day but most effectively in the morning and afternoon.

Effects are typically felt quite immediately with these recommendations. Some degree of improvement is seen within one week for most people. All? No. Most. Some people have very tough blockages which require a lot of massaging and slooow headway – one nutrient at a time. One intervention at a time.

Introduce one nutrient or one change at a time – every few days – so you are assured it is either helping, doing nothing or hindering. If you add many things or change many things at once, it becomes frustrating trying to pinpoint what is going on.

SUMMARY:
It is important to prepare your cells and other biochemical pathways before stimulating them with methylfolate and methylcobalamin.

Following the lifestyle, dietary and environmental recommendations in the MTHFR Protocol post is a very important first step.

The next step is to begin with some basics – and these basics are as explained above:

  • electrolytes
  • glutathione
  • B vitamins (no B12 and no methylfolate)
  • multivitamin/multimineral (no B12 and no methylfolate – plus no Iron or Copper)
  • reducing stress by supporting lifestyle, diet and adrenals

Implementing these things may significantly improve your ability to tolerate methylfolate and methylcobalamin.

This is definitely a big start in the right direction and should help many people.

ALREADY TAKING METHYLFOLATE AND FEEL GREAT?
Excellent! However, it may be a ‘honeymoon’ period and in a few days or weeks, side effects may appear.

Discuss this article with your doctor and make appropriate changes to your protocol.

Just think of a bell-shaped curve.

Before you started taking methylfolate, you felt terrible. You began taking it and started to feel good. Day after day goes by and you continue to improve. In time if the above things are not corrected, you will begin to slide down the other side of the bell-shaped curve.

My whole point of this article is to prevent this from happening!

My goal is to keep you feel amazing!

I’ve made people go down the ‘other side’ by not pulsing methylfolate and by not preparing their biochemistry for it. It is much harder getting them back where they were than it is preventing them from getting side effects in the first place.

Do heed this warning.

I’ve seen it happen way too much – caused by me, caused by other doctors and caused by over-excited people feeling amazing and pushing their system too hard with methylfolate. Methylfolate is powerful.

Keep in control.

If you feel amazing, that could be a warning shot across the bow to actually stop taking the methylfolate for a day or two.

That is how I do it.

Remember, I am compound heterozygous MTHFR myself which means my MTHFR enzyme is reduced by about 70% in function.

Do I take methylfolate every day?
No. I take it when I feel mentally slow or use my brain heavily such as during conferences or writing long articles such as this 🙂 (but I won’t take it now because it is midnight and time to go sleep. I don’t want my adrenals to get taxed…)

Long Term Solution for your MTHFR Mutation

Now that you realize you have to be careful with methylfolate, I’d really like to see you get on a full program vs just supplementing – and possibly making yourself worse.

Reading my book, Dirty Genes, will help you immensely.

You’ll learn about MTHFR and how to use methylfolate in depth, yes, but you’ll learn WAY more than that.

Empower yourself and take action the right way.

Dirty Genes is the guide you’ve been looking for.

It continues to be a bestseller month after month for good reason.

Dirty Genes book by Dr. Ben Lynch

You’ll see why once you pick it up and start reading 😉

Don’t like reading books? Want to get more in depth and see how it all ties together?
Get access to the Dirty Genes Course where I discuss how food, lifestyle, environment, mindset and genetics are influencing how you’re feeling – and how to deal with it all.

The Dirty Genes Course is where I bring in a lot of published research, translate it and make it actionable for you. It’s an extension of the book, Dirty Genes. There is a lot of science, biochemistry and actual examples of how to use this stuff in your daily life.

Is it going to be over your head in terms of difficulty?

Absolutely not.

You’ll learn a ton and you’ll be amazed how easy it is to implement what you learn.

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8 years ago

Would electrolyte/mineral drops work well also? Are you familiar with the mineral drops? Thanks

7 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Systemic Formulas is another company in this exceptional category who have original owners. Stuart Wheelwright…son of original biochemist “Doc” Wheelwright owns the company. Grandson and biochemist Dr. Shayne Morris is head of the formulations. Other notable research scientists are Dr. Jack Tips & Dr. Daniel Pompa. I personally train under all three of these phenomenal healers. I learned about you and Seeking Health from one of my clients. Thank You for your unwillingness to compromise quality and for your commitment to helping other patients and and practitioners understand MTHFR.

Terilynn
7 years ago
Reply to  Debbie Brenner

All due respect Debbie Brenner but Systemic Formulas use a one size fits all mult ingredients idea which I had the experiences from hell with the GCel (Glutathione), Ga (adrenal) and MoRS Methyl Donor.

There is no way to separate all the ingredients and with so many SNPs variations and IF and WHICH genes are expressing, those are very dangerous supplements! I will never try them again and the chiropractic Dr did it ALL backwards and never went low and slow. Most of their ingredients my body does not tolerate in their combos or strengths.That said, I cannot tolerate even Seeking Health multivitamin powder 🙁 that’s just my body.

On Systemic Formulas, my thyroid levels went completely haywire with the highest free T4 (way over the limits) I have ever had of course setting me up for a year of reverse t3 hell 🙁 and the company NEVER responded as my ND was on vacation.

All I can say is never never again!
One size fits all thinking does NOT work here!!

I am VERY appreciative Dr Lynch does such in depth research and creates individual ingredient supplements from acceptable and well tolerated forms. I could not have achieved what I have achieved with him and Seeking Health.
Thank you Dr Lynch, Mrs Lynch, and the Seeking Health Team!
Keep up the great work!!

Gemma
8 years ago

Dr Ben are these recommendations suitable for children? My 2yo has recently started with B12 and methylfolate on the advice of our naturopath and it has improved her moods greatly but she has come out in a rash and is very itchy. I’m still waiting for our nat to get back to me but thought your recommendations might be a good place to start?

Gemma
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Thank you so much Dr Lynch 🙂 I really appreciate the work you do and find it fascinating – and useful!

Powell
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

By histamine block you mean normal over the counter anti histamines? I’ve had extremely high histamine responses as well

Mary
7 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

I see Histamine Block contains corn. Do you have a similar product that is corn free?

Dr. Aron
7 years ago
Reply to  Mary

Mary – please contact support at http://www.seekinghealth.com for product questions.

Leanne
8 years ago

Thanks for this. I had a cellular nutrition test that showed I am deficient in glutathione (I am compound heterozygous for MTHFR). I tried taking NAC, but had awful fatigue side effects. Do you think I may do better with liposomal glutathione?

Also, a stool test showed I have fat malabsorption. Is this something you see with MTHFR?

I am beginning to think many of my issues — adrenal fatigue, hypoglycemia, anxiety may all be related to my MTHFR. I seem to tolerate up to 1mg MTHF daily and methylcobalamin, but have not noticed much change in my symptoms.

Mary Jane
4 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Hi Dr. Lynch, how much Vitamin B1 and Molybdenum should I take per day before starting Glutathione? I suspect I”m intolerant to sulfur. Thank you

Jeanne
7 years ago
Reply to  Leanne

The fat malabsorption is also one of the symptoms of celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, which causes all of the other issues too. It just takes a blood test for Ttg to find out. I hope you keep searching till you find your core problem and don’t stop till you get your answers.

Anna
8 years ago

Leanne – try lipase digestive enyzmes for fat malabsorption. It is on amazon. It helped my daughter and I tremendously in absorbing fats into our diet.

julie van
8 years ago

thank you so much for this article. i believe it explains my reaction to Methyl cpg supplement for my mthfr homogenous c677t mutation. after 7 days straight on the supplement I awoke on the eighth day with extreme dizziness the dizziness lasted on and off for the last 4 Weeks. I assume my electrolytes must be extremely low. I drink smart water 1 liter a day with electrolytes in it is this not enough? Do I need to be taking in more electrolytes? Not sure why I had this reaction.

julie van
8 years ago

Thank you so much for this article!I had a very bad reaction to methyl cpg supplement that my dr. Prescribed for me after receiving my Mthfr blood work that i was homogenous c677t. After 7 days of this supplement i became extremely dizzy! I stopped taking the supplements immediately and even took some niacin as you have suggested. After reading this article I assume my electrolytes must have been extremely low. I drink one liter of SmartWater everyday which contains electrolytes. Is this not enough for me? Should I be taking more? Not sure as to why the dizziness lasted after the supplements were stopped?

annie
8 years ago

Hello =)
What tests will show if we would benefit from this protocol? I have had a whole lot of blood work done this year, so I have a lot to refer to if need be. I am an overmethylator and dont make enough histamine (per my funct med gal)
Adrenal fatigue/CFS last year (diagnosed by symptoms only, no tests), then had tests this year showing low thyroid, fatigue would NOT stop…..then funct. med gal provided me with some supplements to balance out the issues she found via bloodwork (overmethylation, excess copper, low histamine producer, etc). Feeling better but not good enough yet.
Thanks for any tips and direction!
Annie

Maggie
8 years ago

Excellent article – thank you for all the work you do and all the free information you provide!
Was the prenatal designed to take everyday or should the advice from this article be recommended for the prenatal as well? Also, if a woman is mid-way through her pregnancy, would it be advisable to start the Optimal prenatal if she’s never taken methylfolate or methylcobalamin before? Thanks!

Nikki
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Dr. Ben,

Related question: should women with MTHFR who are in childbearing years and who may become pregnant pulse, or should they treat themselves as if they may be pregnant at any time and take a prenatal? What would you suggest for a woman who only tolerates lower doses of methylfolate (400 mcg., for instance, per day) and is in that situation?

Nicole
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Dr. Ben,

Related question, if you don’t mind: should women with MTHFR mutations who are in childbearing years and who know they may become pregnant at any time pulse as suggested here, or should they treat themselves as if they may be pregnant and take a prenatal or at least methylfolate at the higher dose appropriate for pregnancy? What would you suggest for a woman who only tolerates lower doses of methylfolate (400 mcg., for instance, per day) and is in that situation? I am homozygous A1298C. I seem to do well with the Optimal multivitamin and some extra electrolytes, but my anxiety ramps up when I increase methylfolate.

Dawn
8 years ago

Hi Dr. Lynch. I’m intrigued by your adrenal cortex recommendation, but would like to do further reading (when I do a Google search, the results tend to lean toward the “quackery” aspect). I’m C677T++ with chronic mood disorders and a horrible stress response (I have always “reacted” rather than “responding”). My husband is an endocrinologist, and I know better than to bring up the topic of “bovine adrenal cortex” with him. 🙂

Thanks for the article.

Vickie Martin
8 years ago

Whew… there’s so much information and it’s so hard to make sense of it all. First, I am MTHFR C677 T/T, so does this means I am homozygous? My Doc prescribed Metanx, two capsule per day, which I have tolerated well since starting Aug 14. I want to follow your protocol, but I am confused about about adding multi and B vitamins along with Metanx. I am thinking that is too much. I would appreciate you input. Also, are your products interchangable with Metanx? Do you require a prescription?

Tessa
8 years ago

Hi Dr. Lynch,

Are there some people who will just never tolerate methyl folate and methyl B12 (and other methyl donors), even after opening up and supporting other pathways? After a lot of work with pathway support, I can tolerate folinic acid and hydroxy B12, but even the smallest amount of methyl folate or methyl B12 gives me symptoms. Diet and lifestyle factors are in place. I’m compound hetero and desire a family. I had a methylation profile – methionine 1.9 (1.6-3.6), cysteine 27 (20-38), SAM 98 (86-145), SAH 11.7 (10-22), homocysteine 9.5, cyststhionine 0.02 (<0.05), SAM:SAH 8.3.
Thank you so much for all of your work!

Tessa
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Thanks Dr. Lynch!

I have SNPs for CBS, COMT, DAO, MAO, MTRR, PEMT, VDR BSM…

Methyl B12 triggers a migraine and the last time I tried methyl folate (about 100mcg) I felt anxious. When I tried methylfolate originally (over a year ago) I experienced palpitations, insomnia, anxiety, tunnel vision, heard voices…

Thanks for your help! Would the practitioner portal be a good venue to post more information? I’ve taken some of your courses and am looking forward to more – want to help myself and help others!

Laura
7 years ago
Reply to  Tessa

Hi Tessa,
MTHFR and COMT. Did Dr. Lynch ever respond to this? I too have touble with methyls. What did you figure out? Thanks!

Kate
5 years ago
Reply to  Laura

Me too. Any updates or additional information.

Bea
8 years ago

Dr Lynch, thank you for this helpful article.

I want to apply your suggestions, but am stuck because my sulfur sensitivity doesn’t go away. It started one year ago when I was given high doses of B12 & folic acid – I started having a severe reaction to all protein foods and sulfur supplements (severe cardiac and brain symptoms). This year I’ve had glutathione both IV & orally, with disastrous results each time: severe depression & cognitive problems immediately. I’m hetero for CBS C699T, but this reaction is so extreme. I’ve been avoiding sulfur foods & supps for 3 months now; I know this is a long time, but I still react to protein when I try, so I don’t know how to move forward. I will be so grateful for any advice. Thank you!!!

(I’ve been taking Molybdenum 200mcg for over a month without noticing any improvement. But my recent urine elements showed rather high molybdenum in my urine, so I’ve stopped now).

Bea
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Dr Lynch, thank you very much for your reply! These are very helpful points for me. I will follow them up.

As you suggested, I will try B1. I know this is a sulfur-containing vitamin, so I haven’t been taking it…but I think you are saying that this will actually improve my sulfur elimination?

Thanks for your help!

Julia
7 years ago
Reply to  Bea

Dear Bea, I have the same problem. CBS mutation and since high doses of methylfolate and -cobalamin no more tolerance for protein foods ans sulfur supplements in the brain. Did B1 help you? Or did you find an other solution? I would be happy to hear from you. Thank you! Julia

Bea
7 years ago
Reply to  Julia

Hi Julia, sorry for the late reply. I’ve done a few things, with mixed results.

First of all, I discovered that the heart problems upon eating protein (chest pains, shortness of breath, etc) are all from potassium deficiency. This started when I was given large doses of B12 and folic acid. But eating protein always made it worse. I had to take a large dose of potassium for a couple of months – I experimented with the dose that would stop the chest pains and shortness of breath. Now I’ve been able to stop the potassium. I still don’t know why eating protein made the overmethylation even worse.

For the brain symptoms, the most useful thing has been supporting the urea cycle. I realized that my brain symptoms upon eating meat were exactly the symptoms of ammonia toxicity. When I tried measures to reduce ammonia, my brain symptoms cleared. That confirmed the ammonia diagnosis for me. Now I take L-ornithine to support the urea cycle.

Having to go without protein was making me weaker and sicker. The only way I found to eat protein is by taking L-Ornithine at the same time. I also take a Solgar product that is Arginine-Ornithine. That also seems to help.

I can eat vegetable proteins like lentils, legumes etc, and an egg. But animal meats, e.g. chicken, still cause brain symptoms.

I also take Calcium D Glucarate. I tried taking B1, but it gave me head symptoms (eyes aching, pressure in the head, etc) so I had to stop. Also, with the overactive CBS, I realized that my B6 was depleted. I started taking B6 (in P5P form), and that has been very helpful for excitotoxicity. B6 is needed for making GABA, the main calming neurotransmitter, and an overactive CBS uses up all the B6. I gradually increased my B6 dose, with good results for anxiety.

Finally I started taking high doses of antioxidants to relieve the oxidative stress. In my case Vitamin E has been very helpful, to prevent some brain symptoms. Also Selenium because my levels always test low (probably due to mercury using up selenium). I haven’t tried taking sulfur supplements.

Alex
3 years ago
Reply to  Bea

Hi Bea,

I have the same symptoms and sensitivity to proteins as you.
Did your symptoms fade away over time or are they still present?

Bea
8 years ago

I should add that I’m a 36 year old female, with no prior history of heart issues. The cardiac problems only started after taking high doses of B12 & folic acid; since that time, eating protein causes symptoms of heart failure, i.e. chest pains, intense shortness of breath, palpitations on slight exertion. Along with brain fog, headache etc.

Taking IV glutathione has caused disorientation, slurry speech, lack of balance, clumsiness, excessive sleepiness, short-term memory loss. So it’s a very extreme reaction that happens with sulfur supplements.

I don’t know how to move past this sulfur sensitivity. Again, thank you for any help!!

7 years ago
Reply to  Bea

Bea how was your sodium level when had these IV glutathione? My daughter had very similar reaction when on neuropathy drug because it decreased her sodium and may have done something to her folate level as well as she is low in that now.

Bea
7 years ago
Reply to  Kathleen

Hi Kathleen, thanks for your reply. I went back to my blood tests to answer your question about the sodium levels. They seem to be fine — the normal range is 135-145, and mine was 142. However, I think the treatments caused a large Potassium deficiency. I learned that this is common, especially with B12 injections. Taking potassium has helped some of my symptoms. The serum blood tests didn’t show my deficiency — I only found out when I tested Red Cell Potassium.

I don’t know if any of this could apply to your daughter. I am sorry to hear about her problems. What I’ve found is that the right testing is very important — the standard blood tests (serum) didn’t reveal my potassium deficiency at all, but the Red Cell test was different.

Thank you for the heads up on the sodium / folate. And best wishes for your daughter’s recovery!

7 years ago
Reply to  Bea

Thank you Bea for the information about potassium in red blood cells. I’ve heard that the same thing can be true of magnesium. Don’t understand why they don’t do the more accurate test if it is a serious issue like yours and my daughters. They must have checked her electrolytes 6 times but always just normal blood draws.

Santino
8 years ago

Hello Dr. Lynch,

what about the multivitamin with relatively low b12 and methylfolate?

I thought, this would be something most people can start with and take it everyday to adress everything just a little bit. My plan was to do this and then slowly put more supplements into my plan to address my SNPs.

At this moment, I feel tired the hole day with brain fog. Don´t eat any gluten or diary since months. But also no vitamins or minerals. Do lot of sports and also relaxation. But I have brain fog and little constipation, feeling not good in my colon…

KR,
Santino

Debbie
8 years ago

Hi Dr. Lynch,

Thank you for this article.
I have a question about the B Minus supplement : Is the leucine added for a specific reason and can it cause side effects, perhaps as a result of creating an imbalance with other amino acids? This may sound silly- but I heard, for instance, that taking glycine reduces glutamine and can prevent sufficient removal of ammonia from the brain…and since I can’t tolerate any supplement for more than two days, I am always concerned about possible unknown effects…

TIA.

Jim
8 years ago

Hi Dr. Lynch,

I notice that many of your supplements contain a lot of herbal ingredients. I was wondering what your stance is on salicylate and other intolerances (like oxalates)?

I’d like to purchase several of your products, but can’t seem to tolerate salicylates. Also have discovered I have a problem with taurine. It causes cramps, twitching every time, perhaps because it’s a mild diuretic?

I would love to hear your opinion on salicylate and other food intolerances.

Thank you,

Jim

Henrik
8 years ago

Dear Dr. Lynch,

this man or women (http://www.mthfrheds.com) has written an very interesting article where he/she states that she had to avoid food with high levels of folate and still avoid these to stay healthy. The reason is that he/he cannot bring this into it´s active form and the cumulating folate leads to symptoms.

What do you think of this?

I also experienced that when eating many green veggies I first felt great for one week but then I felt even worse than before…

Is this because of the folate? I am also C667T AG and A1289 C GT…

Thank you for answering!

Henrik

Caledonia
8 years ago

Dr. Lynch, what doses of B1 and molybdenum would you suggest for opening up the sulfite pathway?

Also, I could swear that previously you had suggested using NAD in conjunction with glutathione to make sure it converts to the good reduced glutathione and not the bad oxidized glutathione. Now you’re saying FAD – can you clarify?

Caledonia
8 years ago

Also, I forgot to ask – would you suggest remaining on a lower maintenance dose of B1 and molybdenum after doing the sulfite pathway treatment, so that the pathway remains open? If so, what maintenance doses do you suggest?

Lisa Worthing
8 years ago

Thank you so much for writing this article! I, too, cannot tolerate methylfolate or most B vitamins. Looking forward to trying this protocol and see what happens. When you first posted this, I was reading it and followed a trail (?) to a list of doctors who have taken one or more of your courses/seminars and treat patients (by state). I can’t seem to find that again…could you re-direct me there? Thanks so much!

Lisa Worthing
8 years ago

Oh, never mind. I found it! 🙂

Cathi Hepworth
8 years ago

Thank you Dr. Lynch, This discussion is very helpful about when to back off, and how to prepare the body to respond the best before adding methylfolate. My son could not tolerate much methylfolate to begin with, so we backed off, added some of your optimal turmeric and optimal start for about 3 weeks, and then proceeded to start with the methylfolate and add slowly from there. He is on about 2.5 to 3mgs currently. We would love to able to recommend to him a multivitamin, but I am concerned about giving him your multi because it combines niacin and methylfolate. Doesn’t that pose a problem together? Won’t the niacin cancel out the methylfolate in the vitamin as well as the excess methylfolate he already takes? What are your thoughts about this, and can you recommend what to do? Obviously, our son is getting niacin in his diet already, as well, but he really needs a multi. Thanks

Meg
8 years ago

How do we know how much to take? I feel pretty stable (only get mood swings due to bad diet). I am compound hetero (childbearing age) and take 1000 mcg of methylfolate and cobalamin a day, as well as 50 mg of p5p. I feel good. BUT, my homocystein is HIGH at 10!!! And my folate and B12 levels are high as well. I am worried about the high homocystein in case I get pregnant. Does this correlate to the amount of folate I am taking? THANKS, great article!!

Kathy
8 years ago

Would love to see a debate between you and William Walsh, PhD. How do you respond to his criticism of methylating supplements and folate?

Maria Smith
8 years ago

Dr. Lynch,

You’re a brilliant mind! Just like you I’m compound heterozygous. I LOVE all of this information, but sincerely I am struggling trying to wade through it all and form it into a comprehensive “to do” list specific to my symptoms. I’m floundering out here on my own and my Naturopath has just enough MTHFR information to be a bit “dangerous”: “Take Folate and Methyl B12”. That’s the extent of her suggestions. I’m floundering out here on my own trying to decipher so much information I’m reading on the internet. My brain can’t seem to make clear sense of it all pertaining to my personal situation.

My biggest struggle since trying to deal with my MTHFR is the random days of extreme irritability, sudden anger and maladaptation. I’m tired of it and so is my husband. :/ I’m scared I’m going to be like this the rest of my life…and that’s a hopeless feeling. I don’t like myself very much when this is happening.

I understand you don’t have clinical appointments with patients, but can you refer me to a doctor that has been to many of your conferences and has a VERY CLEAR handle of how to deal with Methylation issues beyond “take Methyl B12 and Folate and stay away from Folic acid”? I’m willing to have coaching sessions over the phone or Skype.

Thank you so much for all you do!

Maria Smith
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Dr. Lynch,

I so appreciate your response, knowing how very busy you are!! Thank you!

I do take L-5MTHF (Included in Systemic Fomulas’ G/Cel and Hydroxocobalamin in my sublingual Perque B12). I’m on high doses of the Perque, per my Naturopath. I will back off on that and see if any improvement in irritability/anger.

I’m also on Bioidentical Hormone Creams (DHEA, Estradiol, Progesterone). I will talk with my Doctor about the Estrogen cream possibly being an issue.

I have been on Seriphos for a few years now and that did an awesome job of helping me sleep at night.

I take oral, topical, and magnesium drops because my levels were so low. That is now improving, especially with the muscle cramping I used to get at night.

I also take 2 tsp. of sea salt daily as well as Body Bio Mixed Minerals…but, I will look at your Electrolytes as an alternative.

I will absolutely look at all of your recommendations and re-read your article. Sometimes my brain doesn’t fully comprehend what I’m reading upon first pass.

Thank you so much!!!!!!!!!!

Terilynn
8 years ago
Reply to  Maria Smith

Hi Maria,
I am not a practioner and not qualified to give advice. I can tell you the Systemic Formulas made me very sick and very angry!

I was also taking G-Cell and 2 others from SF. They really screwed up my thyroid labs, worst high free t4 and reverse t3 ever complete with hypo symptoms and that was without any increase in my naturethroid thyroid medication.

Please please please be very careful with Systemic Formulas! They put too much other stuff in and you have no control of desired singular amounts! One size does NOT fit all. 🙂
I am much better off with Dr Lynch’s Seeking Health brand.

Maria Smith
7 years ago
Reply to  Terilynn

Terilynn,

I am on soooo many Systemic Formulas supplements. I have loose stools about 1 1/2 to 2 hours after taking them. This has gone on for 1 year now. I have been on the Chelating program (DMSA, ALA, G/Cel and Bind) with Dr. Dan Pompa (who helps formulate Systemic Formulas) to rid my body of lead. My last lab tests in December showed a dramatic DROP in my T4, T3, Free T3 and Free T4….that’s going the WRONG way. :/ I don’t know if this is due to the SF supplements, or was due to me dropping my Naturethroid by 1 grain, trying to get off of meds all together. Maybe it was too soon…so when my labs came back in December, I had to increase my Naturethroid back UP to 3 grains. Bummer. My other concern is my blood sugar. I never took my fasting blood sugar at home before working with Dr. Pompa, so I’m not sure if there is correlation with using the SF products, but I can NOT get my fasting blood sugar below 110!!! Using his Cellular Healing Diet, I do not eat any sugar (including maple syrup, honey, or high sugar fruits). I eat only grassfed proteins, grassfed dairy (raw cheeses and raw/organic whole whipping cream and Beyond Organic raw havarti cheese), and some berries. I just don’t understand why I can’t get my fasting blood sugar down either. Oh, and my NMR test (a lipid test that’s more accurate than regular testing) shows VERY HIGH levels of Large Lipid Particles….which is not good if trying to prevent heart attacks, strokes, etc. I don’t know why this is all happening…. I have about 9 months left on my coaching contract with Dr. Pompa, so Lord willing things will improve by the end of the year. If not, I need to go another direction. Thanks so much for your input!

Jessica
7 years ago
Reply to  Maria Smith

Hi Maria,
I am in the exact same situation as you. My naturopath is great, but I need someone who has fully researched this. I’ve researched some of the doctors who are recommended (taken a course), but honestly, I don’t think this is enough. To be recommended, more training should be required.

I have severe anxiety reactions to B12. I try to summarize Dr. Lynch’s recommendations and take them to my doctor. This is extremely time consuming and pretty much has taken over my life. I need to find balance, but at the same time need to address this correctly without making things worse. Given my reaction to B12, my doctor suspects Pyroluria, so I’ve been taking B6 and zinc. She wants me to try B12 again but I am so fearful. I am going to take in these recommendations and ask to do them first.

Like you, I also have hormone challenges. I am on so many blended supplements and things (estrogen patch, migraine meds) that I am now focusing on how to get off of them. It is difficult to tell what is helping anymore.

But the #1 thing that has helped is my diet. A couple months ago I switched to a higher fat diet (Bulletproof Diet) and it was EXACTLy what my body needed. My hormone symptoms are less and I am trying to wean off the estrogen patch.

Please keep posting with any updates or findings.

Maria Smith
7 years ago
Reply to  Jessica

Hi Jessica,

I too am on sooo many blended supplements and don’t know what is helping and what isn’t.

Recently, I stopedp taking 6 sublingual Perque B12 to see if this would help with my horrible irritability. I show low B12 on my last Spectracell Nutrient profile test, so I’m leary about staying off B12 for too long. So, this past 2 weeks, I have been taking 2 sublinguals about every 3 days.

To be honest, I don’t know if this is helping or not due to my hormone imbalance as well. When I switched my Natural Radiance Progesterone cream to Progestelle (coconut oil based) Progesterone oil, after six weeks my hot flashes returned with a vengeance and I had horrible depression for about 7 days (last week).

We are such a complex web of hormones and methylation actions, and toxin exposures that it’s sooooo difficult to narrow down what is exactly causing these issues. Sometimes I wonder if I need to go off ALL of my supplements (not my natural dessicated thyroid medication, though) for a time, then add back ONE at a time to see which is helping. But, because I’m a slooooow methylator, this would take me probably 1 year to add back everything necessary. Meanwhile, I could bring on deficiencies while slowly adding things back.

Last night, I had to switch back to the Natural Radiance Progesterone cream. We’ll see how long it takes to get rid of the hot flashes again. 🙂

It’s sooooo difficult and frustrating out here!!!! Thanks for your concern.

Kari
4 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

If methyfolate is making you feel terrible but your homocysteine is 12.7 what do you recommend? Without the methylfolate I feel melancholy and sad. With it can get irritable, anxious and vertigo. Everyday is different. Would love to have any help or suggestion!

Jodi Harms
8 years ago

Hi Dr Lynch,

Thank you for your article. I started taking your optimal multivitamin recently and just wanted to clarify. I take 4 a day at the moment – based on your article does that mean I don’t need to be taking the multivitamin everyday???

Ernesto Alvidrez
8 years ago

Where can I buy some of you supplements, especially the electrolytes solution?

john
8 years ago

Dr Lynch for me molybdenum caused constipation, bloating and wiring effect while I did not exceed 500mcg. I do have bad reaction to sulfur containing foods. I am trying to support my BHMT08+ at the same time. Also when I try to support my liver with milk thistle I get fatigue so gut problems due to toxins reabsorption? But I am still skeptical regarding molybdenum :/

Cindy modrosic
8 years ago

Thank you for this article. I am also compound Hetero. I stopped taking foltx/folbic when I found your research. I recently found a dr within an hour of my office on your website. He recommended a methyl folate supplement with other b vitamins. I have been taking it for about 6 weeks now. I don’t feel drastically different, but my corticosteroid induced myopathy finally seems to be resolving itself (I stopped the prednisone 12/20/2013.) my dr tested my homocysteine and found it to be slightly elevated. I have noticed no negative side effects past frequent urination, which seems to be lessening. My question is, should I keep taking the folate and b vitamins every day til my homocysteine levels are normal again and then take it as needed and should I do anything else for the frequenct potty trips? I should also mention the dr had me do a 2 week liver flush which helped with weight loss from the prednisone and I have continued to work hard to keep my sugar intake low. Thank you.

Michelle
8 years ago

Dr Lynch- thank you for this article! It explains all my symptoms that I have struggled with my entire life- extreme anxiety, food and mood sensitivities where my parents have said its “all in my head”, frequent urination, brain mood, startle easy, ect.! Where do I begin? How do I get tested for Mthfr?

8 years ago

Hi Dr Lynch, I am living in Australia, diagnose with dermatomyosits a year ago which was triggered by early breast cancer. Have just finished the journey of surgery, chemo and radium. I have just joined your page and find it very interesting. What are the basic tests that I need to get done to work out what I need/do not need to supplement? Thanks. Mary

Stephen
3 years ago
Reply to  Mary O'Neill

NutrEval/ONE Profile, organic acids (great plains laboratory), Doctors Data hair analysis, urine essential elements, fat-soluble vitamins profile, red blood cell minerals, methylation panel, plasma amino acids, dutch test, GPL-tox, comprehensive blood work with zinc/copper (both serum and plasma)/b12/p5p/folate/etc, GI-Map, GI effects, GI 360.

Kim
8 years ago

So glad you take the time to write these wonderful gems. My doc had me on weekly IV’s of Methyl B’s, Folate and a glutathione push for 10 weeks, plus taking a multi B orally. Retested my hs-crp among other things, labs did not improve (actually got worse) hs-crp went through the roof, was 8 and went to almost 13. She was not sure why, not familiar with CBS, COMT genes that I have plus many others ( I ordered 23 and me). She only tested for MTHFR, Factor V Leiden. Wanted to keep me on my supplement protocol but I decided not. I take a few things now, not every day but frankly my feet, hands, joints hurt so much I am not sure what helps and what does not. I will try some of the things you recommended and see how I feel. Thanks again, good info. I think many of us give up on spending thousand of dollars at our functional med docs who don’t have enough pieces of the puzzle, so we treat ourselves. Not so great probably, but we have to try something.

Missy Houghtaling
8 years ago

Thank you so much for all of the information you share here. I have a question about electrolytes. I’m told I need to address this by adding salt to my water. I have adrenal fatigue, some early autoimmune disease. Compound heterozygous MTHFR and some other mutations.
The electrolytes you recommend here are high in Mg and potassium, right? Do I need to add salt (like pink salt) to the electrolyte drink re: adrenal fatigue to ensure enough sodium – or would just salting food to taste be ok if using the electrolyte drink? I follow a modified autoimmune paleo diet, so I’m not eating processed foods. I’m on some methylated B’s from my ND and have felt great since adding that! She has me on NAC instead of glutathione.

Missy
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Thanks so much!

Heather
8 years ago

On the first day I started methylfolate and each time I have increased the amount, I have one day of feeling incredibly relaxed. I have fibromyalgia and those days are the only ones I can recall with no pain and no jumping whenever someone touches me. What could cause this? Does the fact that it only lasts a day mean I still need to increase the amount I take? I am homozygous for C677.

8 years ago

Hi Dr. Lynch. Just listened to your podcast with Sean Croxton on the MTHFR mutation, and having just learned I have such a gene, I loved the information. The info in this piece is helpful as well and I thank you for sharing! Respectfully thought I’d mention the line where you write…Optimal Electrolytes is based upon my infamous MTHFRade formula…Infamous means famous in a bad way and I bet that’s not how your formula is known. 🙂

Robin
8 years ago

Thank you for this article and all your work! I have 677TT and also some CBS and COMT issues. My ND has me on your liquid methlyfolate and your multi that has the methlyfolate and methylcobalamin in it. I take everyother day and only 5 drops of the the methylfolate and 1 capsule of the multi I am also on hydrox B12 and niacin every other day to. All your products but I still get really irritable and I don’t know what to do. I just ordered the electrolyte formula you have as I have issues with being dizzy, insatiable thirst and frequent urination. I take magnesium at night so hopefully this wont cause any problems with that. I am just wondering how do I get the irritableness and anger to go away? She thinks I need to the methyl pathways open so I am taking what she says because I want this to work but will it work? Thank you again for everything!

Robin
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

thank you Dr Lynch. I will talk to my doctor and look into getting those supplements. I didn’t mention I take 5htp also in the afternoons because my neurotransmittors are out of wack. I was only sleep 4 hours straight at night but now I get at least 5 so its better. I find the magnesium helps that. Will the ashwaganda hinder my sleep? Thank for responding.

Robin
8 years ago
Reply to  Robin

It means so much that you would respond to my message so thank you. I am going through some methlylation issues today because I went from doing the protocol my doctor told me to do at every three days and as she said if no problems increase to every other day. So last week I did that and yesterday and today have been very bad days. Tired, sick, anxious, irritable, depressed and sad. I am stopping the methylation as you said and I asked my doctor and she agreed. Just hoping this feeling will go away soon. Thank you again for the advise and I look forward to trying the electrolyte formula soon. Hoping that will help.

Joe
5 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

How do you increase your morning cortisol? I’m looking for an herb or something to do better in the morning for my adrenals.

Robin
8 years ago

thank you for all you do! I am 677TT and have COMT and CBS issues as well. My ND has me on your liquid Methylfolate (5drops) and multi (1 capsule) with methylfolate and methylcobalamin, Niacin and hydrox B12 everyother day. I just cant get rid of the anxiety and anger issues. I ordered your electrolyte product just today because I have bouts with insatiable thirst and dizziness and frequent urination. Your protocol calls for not doing the methyl’s at least not all the time but I don’t seem to be able to use them at all,. My doctor says she trying to get me to clear the pathways so I am continuing what she says. I tried the liposomal glutathione and felt the same feelings as the methyl products, however I tried the glutathione every day in a small amount so would it be better to do that every other day to start and should I still be doing the methyls? Thanks so much again for all you do you are really a blessing.

Michael_Dowdy
8 years ago
Reply to  Robin

Hello Robin. All of the symptoms you mention can be linked to diabetes. Doctors have told me that judging from the amount and time of onset of my neuropathy that my diabetes must have been hidden for a long time. If you haven’t had a glucose tolerance test it may be a good idea to ask about one. This is all evolving science and medicine and what is thought to be correct today could be proven wrong tomorrow. Methylation is obviously a key pivotal genetic issue and needs to be looked at very seriously. I have two copies of the 677CT mutation. Natural vitamins and products are clearly superior to synthetic ones. Natural TMG, another methyl donor derived from beets, seems to have been very helpful to me. But even natural products can have big potential problems. Kidney stones can be caused by too much protien in the diet. Leucine, a BCAA, is beneficial to diabetics. This site of Dr. Ben Lynch has proven to be the most helpful to me because I have serious methylation issues. Dr. Amy Yasko has looked at the 677TT mutation and it’s likely link to autism. I hope this is helpful to you. Michael M. Dowdy

Terilynn
8 years ago

Dr Ben, you rock!! Thank you so much for all your work and sharing!! Greatly appreciated your feedback on my labs and that you offer such tests and services!

Your feedback validated what I have been doing following the info on your website and making continual adjustments as pathways improve or something new in life needs attention.

I’m looking forward to 2015 and can’t wait to try your recommendations!
I wish I could get my family to listen. Having the MTHFR 677 +/+ and others, creating havoc for them and they do all the wrong things, and wonder why they suffer. 🙁

You are a godsend and I love your sense if humor 🙂 I cannot say thank you enough!

Dan
8 years ago

HI Dr. Lynch,

I seem to be like Heather above, where I feel like the methylfolate (and especially folinic acid) helps me “relax” a bit, and at least get better sleep. If I stop either, then things get worse, including muscle cramps and twitching.

So I’m curious if perhaps because of years of illness (ME/CFS) one’s levels of folate (and/or b12) can be so depleted that even if one does get some anxiety or irritability at times (and the niacin doesn’t seem to help), then in general, could that mean that one basically needs to take the folate more often?

Also, do you have patients who can’t seem to tolerate any sort of taurine or phosphatidylcholine (as in the liposomal products)? I definitely have adrenal issues, but wonder if the taurine is too diuretic as my cramping, twitching seems to get worse when I take either of those. When I add salt, like you recommend above, the cramps and twitching get better, but then my nose and eyes get very dry.

So complicated, but I appreciate any feedback you might be able to offer, even if it’s just on one of these questions. 🙂

Dan
8 years ago

I posted a question earlier wondering why some people who have been ill for a long time might need higher levels of methylfolate or folinic acid, (to replace, rebuild new cells, tissues) but I see it didn’t take.

I’m curious Dr. Lynch what your opinion is on this matter, if you have an idea why some people seem to need a lot more, while others don’t.

And also why niacin may not work for some people?

Dan
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Sorry for the double post Dr. Lynch.

I didn’t see my first post earlier, so tried to repeat it.

Thanks for taking the time to reply — I really appreciate it.

Dan
7 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Hello again Dr. Lynch,

I’m wondering if niacin is a problem for some people, if a sublingual NAD or NADH supplement might be an alternative to help the krebs cycle?

Rebecca
8 years ago

Hi Dr Lynch, I was hoping you might be able to help..

I think I have been taking too much folate and have become overmethylated.

I am 27 weeks pregnant and just had homocysteine checked and it has come back at 1.4

I am homozygous C677T as well as homo or hetero a few others like COMT, MAO, PEMT, MTRR. I generally feel ok, energy and concentration a bit low but sure that is to be expected in pregnancy. Prior to pregnancy was a bit of anxiety, occ low mood, fatigue and poor memory/concentration but my mood is def better in pregnancy. I have mild pyrroles and Zn:Cu ratio often 2:1 (10 Zn, 20 Cu).

I am taking 5 seeking health natal (500mcg folate), 2000mcg hydroxycobalaman, phosphatydlycholine, DHA, Zinc pin (30mg), Iron – mostly seeking health supps.

Am I best going off the multi and B12 for a while and taking some methionine? I have the seeking health one here but not sure if contraindicated in pregnancy.

I am worried being pregnant if I go off the multi I may miss out on something. My diet is pretty good and I have lots of dietary folate, every day.

Appreciate any comments you may have,

Rebecca
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Hi Dr Ben,

Thanks for your quick reply.

Yes I eat heaps of protein, at least 1gm/kg body weight, maybe more.

Homocysteine reference range is 5-12 so it’s way under. 2 year ago my level was spot on at 7 but since i have been taking all these vitamins it has been gradually decreasing.

Do you think I should stop the folate, B12, B6 in particular as they may be bringing it down too much? I was thinking I could try your methionine to up it a bit?

Rebecca

Sarah Smith-Barry
5 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

I love that you created the protein for mothers. You show such compassion through your formulations. Excellent work. I am reading frantically to figure out where to start. Attempted a liver flush and a parasite cleanse with enemas and the amount of liver/spleen pain I experienced for over a week, I wouldn’t wish on my worst enemy. I couldn’t handle it at all when I was expecting it to make me feel better, I also suspect lingering issues because I had mononucleosis really badly in my late teens. Every time I get worn down, its like mono all over again. Finding a doctor that doesn’t look at my lean frame, and young age at face value has proven incredibly challenging. I am a mother of four (plus three more step children) and want to be around for a long time for them. My own other passed, stroke (age 29) when I was three years old. I suspect MTHFR but I am so nervous to get tested for not knowing where to start or where to find a doctor who will address my history and condition without bias to how I look. I eat a ketogenic diet which helps immensely but I have weeks of malaise that are truly debilitating. I just want to be a good mother for my kids and a good wife who can keep up with the demands of the family. Right now, I am hopeful I can figure this stuff out because here in northern Maryland, there are not a lot of doctors to even choose from let alone that can address my issues,

john
8 years ago

Dr Lynch,

Do yo know if molybdenum would interfere with bad bacteria in the gut or sulfate reducing bacteria? How do you specifically target sulfate reducing bacteria?

Melanie
8 years ago

Hello. I recently had my blood taken for amino acids. It came back that I have 5 different low amino acids and one high. I am Herero for c677t. Not sure about anything else. I know I do not absorb nutrients well. Underweight and have never been able to put on weight. I see a nd dealing with digestive issues and sibo. what do you recommend to help absorb nutrients and get amino acids level. I have experienced a LOT of hair loss. Some adrenal issues. Thank you for helping.

Raquel
8 years ago

I have been having repeated episodes of tachycardia, muscle twitches , excessive weight loss , chronic upset stomach altered with constipation and reoccurring low levels of potassium and calcium. I’ve had chronic dehydration ( but I’m constantly drinking water / thirsty and not diabetic ) . Low blood pressure and low body temp. I’ve landed in the ER time and again with no one being able to find the cause for my repeated deficiencies. Any thoughts on this Dr. ? I live in a small town in GA with no sign of any medical practitioners with wisdom to help.

Melanie
8 years ago

What are your recommendations for low amino acids. Also my body doesn’t absorb nutrients well and underweight. Thanks

Padma
8 years ago

Thank you for the article! My kids have been experiencing blank stares, could be absence seizures. I believe they started sometime around starting 5-mthf 1 mg. Does 5-mthf cause seizures if not administered properly?

Raquel
8 years ago

Dr. Lynch,
I just got a test result back showing elevated neropinephrine levels. I am under the care of a Nutritionist. He thinks I’m clearly having methylation issues however, he never proceeded with a treatment plan. He wants to do a hair test for heavy metal toxins. Do you have a better test you recommend that I could take to see of I have a methylation problem? And maybe some advice on what could be causing my elevated neropinephrine levels and some steps to take ?

Ken
8 years ago

Hi Dr. Ben,

The main side effect I experience after consuming methylfolate (even from green leafy veggies) is insomnia. I go so far as to AVOID high folate foods just to get a good night’s sleep. Thoughts on which recommendation is best to help with insomnia?

In Health,
Ken

Jane
8 years ago

I am currently taking Neuro Biologix brand of methyl folate 2/day for about 2 1/2 months. I think I am experiencing the bell curve you speak about – took a while to kick in and then felt great and now am feeling a bit jittery and anxious (tight chest/ hard to breath). I am heterozygous MTHFR. I eat a very clean diet (lots of leafy greens) and exercise regularly. Do I need to back off on the methyl folate a bit? I see my healthcare prof. after the beginning of the year but would like to hear what you think.

Trina
8 years ago

Hi Dr. Lynch – I reacted negatively to the normal protocol, and have been taking your Sensitive Probiotics and Optimal Start successfully. I tried to take Optimal Electrolytes but it causes me to experience anxiety. I do have some SOD snps and am wondering if I have to have my Dr test my manganese, zinc, and copper levels before I begin taking your SOD supplement? And, should I go ahead and start the hydrocobalamin supplement or wait till I can tolerate glutathione. I have also become sensitive to citrus, which I understand creates more histamine. Thank you.

Trina
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Hi Dr. Lynch, Thank you so much for responding to my questions. I will take the electrolytes around mealtime as you suggested. I want to start taking the Seeking Health SOD supplement, but am not sure if I have to find out my blood levels of manganese, zinc, and copper prior to starting. Thank you again. Your work and your words help to keep me encouraged and hopeful.

Trina
8 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

I forgot one more question; there is Vit. B1 & molybdenum in my Optimal Start multivitamin, but would you suggest taking them as additional supplements to help with my tolerance of glutathione? Thank you.

Frank
6 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Hello,
I have also recently started the optimal electrolytes product and I experience irritability and aggression from it, similarly to anxiety. Do you think that form of niacin could be a cause? I do already take it with food.
I was actually wondering whether the creatine could cause the irritability? I am also taking ornithine, and starting taking this at the same time.
Do you think the elevated nitric oxide levels could cause irritability and aggression? I was considering doing the SOD supplement to attempt to address this.. thank you.

Frank
6 years ago
Reply to  Dr Lynch

Thank you so much for getting back to me.

I think the ornithine was causing it and I will adopt your suggested approach to supplementing as required not as a routine.

I did have a further question about muscle twitching as this has been a continuing issue for me and why I started with optimal electrolytes.

I didnt know about the PQQ, is that worth taking alongside the SOD and Glutathione?

Also, alot of people say its more effective taking NAC rather than glutathione because of something to do with glutathiones limited ability to cross the blood-brain barrier.. So was bit confused as to which is better.

Would you be able to explain a bit more about your recommendation of PQQ as I am already taking SOD and Glutathione.

Many many thanks,
Frank

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